Agile, Programming

Tasking

I have been following this seemingly innocuous practice of “tasking” when programming on a story, which I find very useful and I recommend you try it. Here are the what, when and whys of tasking.

What: Breaking the story into small tasks that could be worked on sequentially.

When: Before writing the first line of code for the implementation of the story.

Why:
Understanding: By breaking the story into smaller chunks, it gives a good grasp on the entire scope of the story. It helps define the boundary of the story and gives a good idea of what is in scope and out of scope.
Completeness: Tasking makes you think of the edge case scenarios and is a conversation starter for missed business requirements or even cross functional requirements like security, performance, et al.
Estimation: Doing tasking right in the beginning of the story gives a sense of the story size. On my current project we are following the Kanban process. Ideally we would like to have “right-sized” stories, not too-big not too-small. Tasking helps me decide if the story is too big and if it is, then how could it be possibly split into smaller ones.
Orientation: This has been a big thing for me. I feel I go much faster when I have a sense of direction. I like to know what is coming next and then just keep knocking off those items one by one.
Talking point: If you have 1 task per sticky which I recommend, it serves as a good talking point for say business tasks vs refactoring/tech tasks, prioritizing the tasks, et al.
Pair switch: If you are doing pair programming, like we do, then you could be switching pairs mid way through the story. Having a task list helps retain the original thought process when pairs switch. Stickies are transferable and they travel with you if you change locations.
Small commits: Another big one. Each task should roughly correspond to a commit. Each task completion should beg the question “Should we commit now?”. If you are doing it sooner, even better.
Minimize distration: There is a tendency as a developer to fix things outside the scope of the story like refactoring or styling changes to adjacent pieces of code. If you find yourself in that situation, just create a new task for it and play it last.

Thanks for reading and feel free to share your experiences.

Advertisements
Standard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s